Treeing Walker feet

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Re: Treeing Walker feet

Postby Trueblue » Fri Apr 06, 2012 12:28 pm

twist wrote:I can make a dogs feet tough


No you can't.You may be able to help a dog with weak feet by keeping them in running condition but you can't over come that genetic weakness in some dogs.Weak feet is a HUGE flaw in my book.I don't care how good the dog is.If I can't hunt him because his feet are trashed then he is absolutely no good to me.Dogs like that might be fine for weekend hunters but if you are pounding dogs day after day like I do,then solid feet are a must.
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Re: Treeing Walker feet

Postby twist » Fri Apr 06, 2012 2:59 pm

There is not a dog out there that has bullet proof feet if one thinks that he has not hunted dogs hard enough. I am not a weekend warrior all I do is hunt!( I am pretty lucky to be able to do this)) You have to condition dogs if you want them to catch game yes the old fat hound can get lucky ever so often with the so called tough feet but not my style. Here is a thought you take a bobcat catching machine dog with brains, desire great track speed, great jump speed and awesome locater and tree dogand last but not least good tight feet, lay him up for a year no conditioning and yes when season rolls around you will catch a few cats. Take that same dog and condition him properly and see what your results will be! This is a fact not just a theory. Read my post I said I can make a dogs feet (TOUGH) not change their genetic make up. Just because a dog has nice tight feet doesnt meen they are bullet proof. Andy
The home of TOPPER AGAIN bred biggame hounds.
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Re: Treeing Walker feet

Postby Trueblue » Fri Apr 06, 2012 3:19 pm

twist wrote:. Read my post I said I can make a dogs feet (TOUGH) not change their genetic make up. Just because a dog has nice tight feet doesnt meen they are bullet proof. Andy


I read your post and I understand what you said.I just don't agree with it.I could care less what a dogs feet look like.I don't care if they are pink or black or tight or whatever.The only thing that matters to me is how they hold up to hard hunting.Believe it or not Twist,all dog feet are not created equal,some are tough and durable and some aren't, and that's a fact.I've owned dogs with weak feet and they didn't stay long at my house.
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Re: Treeing Walker feet

Postby twist » Fri Apr 06, 2012 3:48 pm

So if you dont agree with me then you are saying not all dogs feet need conditioned? Andy
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Re: Treeing Walker feet

Postby BIGBLUES » Fri Apr 06, 2012 4:01 pm

I run Black and Tans and also Blueticks for a lot of reasons but one big reason is their feet are tougher than nails. My dogs get little conditioning from April to December and when I start running in December they all get sore feet for about the first 2 weeks then I don't have any issues except when the snow is super crusty their toenails get a little raw. But I can run them almost every other day except when snow conditions are real bad. I use to have walkers and my cousin still does, we both really like them but I personally didn't like the feet. My cousin never complains about his walkers feet but he usually only runs weekends.
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Re: Treeing Walker feet

Postby Trueblue » Fri Apr 06, 2012 4:38 pm

twist wrote:So if you dont agree with me then you are saying not all dogs feet need conditioned? Andy


What I am saying is that you can take two different dogs that have had the exact same PROPER conditioning and their feet may not hold up equally as well.Conditioning is definitely important and will help any dogs durability but like I said that doesn't mean all dogs will have equally tough feet after they have had the proper conditioning.I think most guys who have been at this game for awhile have had those dogs that just had feet problems no matter what you did to prevent it.It is just an inherent problem with some dogs.Conditioning can help it some, but it won't overcome it.I have had dogs that I have had to get rid of for that reason alone.They had the same conditioning as every other dog in my pack but their feet did not measure up to the rest and were a constant problem.If you have had the good fortune not to own any dogs like that then you should consider yourself lucky.I was on board with all your comments until you said that you could make a dogs feet tough.That is true in some cases but not all.
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Re: Treeing Walker feet

Postby kordog » Tue Apr 10, 2012 6:10 pm

the bluetick walker cross is a favorite for some ive been told more than once it makes for a better footed dog with good speed.i have personally found that blackntans have some of the best feet ive found that being said i love my walker dogs and always make looking at the feet a priority before i buy.the worst dog i ever saw foot wise was a walker female her feet were so soft she couldnt run fifty feet on good snow and they would start to bleed.there are obviously walkers with good feet or they wouldnt be so popular look around.conditioning is key to getting the most out of a hounds feet or a hound for that matter ,but it sure does help to have them thick tough sandpaper like pads right from the start . truth be known these walkers are probably burning their pads off like a drag car :joker
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Re: Treeing Walker feet

Postby nait hadya » Sat May 05, 2012 5:15 pm

Ker_man wrote:I'd like to talk Treeing Walker feet. I guess this would be the best place on this site, since at this point I'd like to keep it around the Walkers. :)

Are any hunters or breeders on here making good feet a priority in your breeding program or attempts.

My observations are limited to what I've seen and hunted with in a limited area, but have led me to believe that Tight feet with deep pads, short arched toes, with lots of hair between the toes and tough thick skin make the kind of feet I prefer. That said also like as much black pigmentation as possible.
I know that is a tall order but if you have succeed in breeding any of these qualities I'd like to hear about it. Please PM me if you don't want to post. Thanks, Terry




Feet are top of the list in my hounds and i believe it is something that can't be improved much after the fact. black pigmentation,short arched toes and thick pads are all possible if you select a breeding pair with those qualities. My male has black pigmentation and throws a very high percentage of the same. running a mile or two in very rough country(slow) is much different than running thirty or fourty miles in hard crusted or deep snow. hair, when i ran airedales they would go a hundred yards and chew snow balls from the hair in their feet,never have had that problem in my hounds.
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Re: Treeing Walker feet

Postby nait hadya » Sat May 05, 2012 5:22 pm

Ker_man wrote:Thanks for the reply Andy. I kind of thought I'd hear from you.
What in my above description of good feet has been the easiest or hardest to keep in a breeding program? Terry


the short arched toes has been the toughest in my situation. with a breeding program that combines the biggame hound with coonhound lines,occasionally the long toed coonhound foot emerges and it is not desirable in a breeding program.
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Re: Treeing Walker feet

Postby nait hadya » Sat May 05, 2012 5:29 pm

Trueblue wrote:
twist wrote:I can make a dogs feet tough


No you can't.You may be able to help a dog with weak feet by keeping them in running condition but you can't over come that genetic weakness in some dogs.Weak feet is a HUGE flaw in my book.I don't care how good the dog is.If I can't hunt him because his feet are trashed then he is absolutely no good to me.Dogs like that might be fine for weekend hunters but if you are pounding dogs day after day like I do,then solid feet are a must.



I disagree, a weekend hunter who doesn't have the time to road his hounds all week is exactly who needs a hound with sound,functional feet that will hold up to tough conditions without being conditioned.
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nait hadya
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Re: Treeing Walker feet

Postby nait hadya » Sat May 05, 2012 5:33 pm

twist wrote:There is not a dog out there that has bullet proof feet if one thinks that he has not hunted dogs hard enough. I am not a weekend warrior all I do is hunt!( I am pretty lucky to be able to do this)) You have to condition dogs if you want them to catch game yes the old fat hound can get lucky ever so often with the so called tough feet but not my style. Here is a thought you take a bobcat catching machine dog with brains, desire great track speed, great jump speed and awesome locater and tree dogand last but not least good tight feet, lay him up for a year no conditioning and yes when season rolls around you will catch a few cats. Take that same dog and condition him properly and see what your results will be! This is a fact not just a theory. Read my post I said I can make a dogs feet (TOUGH) not change their genetic make up. Just because a dog has nice tight feet doesnt meen they are bullet proof. Andy


conditioning or lack of has not been an issue with catching game.
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nait hadya
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Re: Treeing Walker feet

Postby nait hadya » Sat May 05, 2012 5:43 pm

twist wrote:I can make a dogs feet tough I cant make them have the abilities to catch cats consistantly that is something called brains and ability I cant make them have these traits, so with that being said I guess everyone knows whats the most important thing to breed for in my eyes is. Andy



there are thousands of guys who will accept hounds with poor feet if only to be successful in their pursuit of game. they are not breeders and have little concern of feet, toes or color as long as the game is in the tree. that does not make it acceptable to breed a hound that throws poor quality feet. the most important thing a responsible breeder breeds for is a complete hound or an improvement in his strain.
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Re: Treeing Walker feet

Postby Ker_man » Sat May 05, 2012 11:57 pm

Conditioning will make any feet better but it won't make bad feet good. Splayed feet let everything up in to injure the feet, soft skin will always break out, even if toughened will be softer than foot that is hard and tough to start out.
Weekend hunter or full time hunter the # of dogs you have to run can influence whether you can tolerate bad feet or not.
I agree that in breeding for feet we can not accept lousing the qualities that make the dog produce game.
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nait hadya
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Re: Treeing Walker feet

Postby nait hadya » Sun May 06, 2012 12:35 am

larry wrote:
dwalton wrote:Feet are very important and conformation in breeding any dog. The problem is if you have a dog with the heart and ability to catch game that does not have good feet are you going to not breed it and breed a lesser dog that has good feet or will you breed it to a good footed dog trying to improve its feet? Dewey

I'll take option number three, not breed it at all and breed a dog that has heart and ability and good feet to another dog bred along the same lines with the same attributes, instead of a dog with 2 out of 3 things going for it. Prime example of why the walker breed has so many crap dogs is that mentality right there, you forgot to even mention option 3. None of your scenario's listed do the breed any favors.



agreed,though you certainly can hunt a poor footed hound if that is all you can get but don't be breeding it and expousing it as a top producer when there are better choices out there.
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nait hadya
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Re: Treeing Walker feet

Postby nait hadya » Sun May 06, 2012 1:54 am

if you look at enough walker hound pictures,especially breeders or those offering stud services you will see that feet, bad feet are often obscured,out of frame or hidden by grass. to me that indicates a problem almost like false advertising.

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